Interest courses | Dominican University College

Interest Courses in Philosophy and Theology

DUC welcomes anyone with an interest in philosophy or theology to audit interest courses. Students who take interest courses without seeking a grade or credit for the course are given auditor status. At DUC, auditors can register for up to 8 credits per semester and do not require any prior knowledge or qualifications to take an interest course. Also, registration into a certificate or degree program is not required. 

If you're auditing a course you'll be expected to complete all course requirements except the final exam, and your transcript will show your status as an auditor for the course. After completing a limited number of courses and achieving a reasonable level of academic success, you may be eligible to enrol in a full-time program of studies. 

 

 

 

Registration process for interest courses

 

Auditors are not required to submit an application package.  Simply register online by clicking on the button of your interest course(s) below or complete the course registration form found here for the desired course(s) and submit the completed form in person at the Office of the Registrar (Office 310) or send by mail to:

Office of the Registrar
96 Empress Ave. 
Ottawa, Ontario
K1R 7G3

For more information regarding course availability, or to make an appointment to register, please email us at info@dominicanu.ca or call us 613-233-5696 (x310).

 


Faculty of Theology

Fall 2018

 

Church History - The Early and Medieval Church

Mondays, 1:30pm - 4:20pm | Fall semester - Starts on September 5, 2018
Professor: Claude Auger
Course Code: DTHY 1350

From Pentecost to the Crusades: A Church is Born! This course will survey the first twelve centuries of Church history. Through preparatory readings and class lectures, the students will explore different topics to better understand the emergence of the Church and its development. While the focus will be on the Catholic Church, the Eastern Church traditions and the birth of Islam and its effect on Christian history will also be explored. Students will attend a service in an Eastern-tradition Church, write a report and present it in class. They will also acquaint themselves with a particular topic or an important spiritual text through research and the writing of a paper.

 


Canadian Catholics Through the Ages

Tuesdays, 5:30pm - 8:20pm | Fall semester - Starts on September 5, 2018
Professor: Claude Auger
Course Code: DTHY 4350

From the arrival of the first priests in Newfoundland in 1498 up to the organization of the International Eucharistic Congress of Quebec City in 2008, the Catholic Church has formed an integral part of the Canadian landscape. Through preparatory readings and class lectures, the students will explore different topics to better understand the implantation of the Catholic Church and its development in Canada. Students will explore their own family religious history, write a report and present it in class. They will also acquaint themselves with a particular topic or an important spiritual text through research and the writing of a paper.

 


An Introduction to the Study of the Pentateuch

Wednesdays, 8:30am - 11:20am | Fall semester - Starts on September 5, 2018
Professor: TBD
Course Code: DTHY 1120

This course studies the first five books of the Bible, that the Jewish tradition calls Torah and the Christian tradition Pentateuch. After a presentation of their content and canonical aspect, their literary problems will be studied, which led to the classical documentary hypothesis. Then, the new approaches will be presented, and finally (time allowing) the major themes of the Pentateuch.

 


Developments in Christian Thought

Thursdays, 1:30pm - 4:20pm | Fall semester - Starts on September 5, 2018
Professor: Louis Roy, O.P.
Course Code: DTHY 1041

In this course, undergraduate students will learn about the methods, purposes and characteristics of theology as a field of inquiry and scholarship, through a survey of the history of Christian theological thinking from the New Testament to the twenty-first century. Through a presentation of significant figures or schools of thought that have contributed and are contributing to theology, students will discover and deepen the various styles of theologizing. This will be achieved thanks to lectures by the professor, discussions in class of texts previously read at home, and personal reflections.

 


The Mystery of God I

Fridays, 8:30am - 11:20am | Fall semester - Starts on September 5, 2018
Professor: Emmanuel Durand, O.P.
Course Code: DTHY 1422

This course tackles the identity of the one God. Does God call indifference and idolatry into question? What are the proper names of God and what is the significance of invoking God? How does reason argue about God’s? Is there any limitation to God’s power? Is there any room in theology for the emotions and the holiness of the Biblical God? Each student will do some readings provided by the professor and participate in further discussions in class. A short paper is due each month.

 


Faculty of Philosophy

Fall 2018

 

History of Ideas - The Rise of Ancient Civilization

Monday, 8:30am - 11:20am | Fall semester - Starts on September 5, 2018
Professor: TBA
Course Code: DPHY 1111

From Prehistory to History. Ancient Egypt: monarchy and social structures. The immortality of the soul. The kingdoms of Mesopotamia: Sumerians and Amorites. The Epic of Gilgamesh and the Code of Hammurabi. The universal empire of Persia. The Zoroastrianism. Ancient Greece: the political structures of the Mycenaean Society. The Iliad and the Odyssey. The notion of Polis. Athens: democracy and social knowledge. The Sophists. Politics in Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. The educative ideas of Isocrates. Rome: the idea of a universal empire. Rome and the laws. The philosophical ideas of Cicero and Seneca.

 


Ethics 1

Tuesdays, 8:30am - 11:20am | Fall semester - Starts on September 5, 2018
Professor: Jean-François Méthot
Course Code: DPHY 2560

This course proposes a study of the main alternatives in ethics today, especially concerned with the following questions: what is really important in life? What is ultimately the right way of living? How can we become better equipped to distinguish between right and wrong? What are the main concepts which operate in the different ethical theories? Examples and cases from applied ethics.

 


Logic 1

Tuesdays, 1:30pm - 4:20pm | Fall semester - Starts on September 5, 2018
Professor: Iva Apostolova
Course Code: DPHY 1130

Logic is the branch of philosophy that deals with the rules and laws of rational thinking. Aristotle, one of the fathers of logic and philosophy as we know them today, defined human as the only animal capable of rational thinking. Understanding the fundamental processes of rational thinking and becoming familiar with the main types of formal logic is a key objective of this course. At the end of the course, students will be able to read the language of symbolic logic, solve problems logically, translate statements and arguments, and determine their truth-value. Students will prove validity and invalidity of arguments using specific tools such as truth tables, derivations, and truth trees. This course is both lecture-based and problem-solving based. Students are expected to work independently on translation and solution of specific problems and use a process of peer evaluation to analyze and verify proposed solutions in class. Assessments also includes periodic written evaluations.


Philosophy of Religion

Wednesdays, 8:30am - 11:20am | Fall semester - Starts on September 5, 2018
Professor: Maxime Allard, O.P.
Course Code: DPHY 2760

Through a critical assessment of philosophical discourses on religion in modernity, this course will attempt to map out the current definitions of religions, their anthropological, ethical and metaphysical conditions and claims. This course will be attentive to their limits and relations to definitions produced by sociological and psychoanalytical discourses. The lectures will focus on religious behaviours and acts, and their effects on individuals and groups. This course is not about "God". It will define the place and function of the images and ideas about the divine in religion.

 


Ancient Greek Philosophy

Wednesdays & Friday, 1:30pm - 4:20pm | Fall semester - Starts on September 5, 2018
Professor: Mark Nyvlt
Course Code: DPHY 1210

In this course, students will be introduced to the basic tenets of ancient Greek philosophy from the early period of around 600 B.C. to the early Christian period. Through a historical and conceptual framework, students will explore the origins of natural science, cosmology, ontology, and theories of human nature and knowing. The course is divided into four parts (1) The Pre-Socratics: the Ionians, Parmenides, Heraclitus, the Pythagoreans, the Atomists, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, and the Sophists. (2) The Athenian philosophy of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. (3) The Roman or Hellenistic philosophical schools of Epicureanism, Stoicism, Scepticism and neo-Pythagoreanism. (4) Neo-Platonism. The teaching approach used in this course will be lecture based. The course will use multi-media tools. Learning activities may include instructor-led discussions and student presentations. At the end of the course, students will be able to identify specific philosophical doctrines of ancient Greek philosophers, their modes of argument, their unique perspectives on thought and explain the unique Greek view of philosophical discourse. Students will be expected to demonstrate their abilities to engage in philosophical arguments.

 


Introduction to Philosophy

Thursdays, 8:30am - 11:20am | Fall semester - Starts on September 5, 2018
Professor: Francis K. Peddle
Course Code: DPHY 1100

In this course, students will be introduced to philosophy as a unique discipline. This means orienting oneself towards philosophy as a distinctive way of thinking about themselves and their surrounding world. Students will encounter philosophy through the study of key fundamental texts that have shaped Western culture. As a distinct discipline, philosophy is based neither on belief of intuition nor on simple observation and experiment. Students will be guided to an identification of some basic problems related to human nature knowledge and decision-making. The primary teaching approach is lecture based but multimedia tools and resources will be used. Learning activities may include instructor-led discussions and students presentations. At the end of the course, students will be able to identify specific philosophical schools, modes of argument, perspective on thinking, and the varying contexts for philosophical discourse. Students are expected to demonstrate their abilities to engage in philosophical arguments and reflections by means of dialogue and written work.

 


Readings in Medieval Philosophy

Thursdays, 1:30pm - 4:20pm | Fall semester - Starts on September 5, 2018
Professor: James Lowry
Course Code: DPHY 2282

Close textual examination of actual writings (in translation) of the mediaeval philosophers. Selections from: Augustine: Confessions, City of God, De Trinitate; Aquinas: Summa Theologiae, Summa contra Gentiles. The writings of various other authors such as Dyonisius the Areopagite, Boethius, Scotus Eriugena, Anselm, Abelard, Bonaventure, Duns Scotus, Ockham and Nicolaus of Cusa may also be included.

 


Philosophical Anthropology

Fridays, 8:30am - 11:20am | Fall semester - Starts on September 5, 2018
Professor: Iva Apostolova
Course Code: DPHY 2580

Since the dawn of philosophy as an academic discipline, thinkers have asked what makes a human, is there such a thing as human nature, is it universal or culturally-dependent, are humans really different than the rest of the animal kingdom? Students in this course will deliberate and expand on some of the main features of human nature and humanness, namely language, historicity, corporeity, consciousness, freedom, and play. Pre-established views will be analyzed and challenged in order for students to form their own understanding of philosophical anthropology. At the end of this course, students will be able to propose their own personal view of human nature and the philosophical question of the meaning of life. This course will use a transformative approach to learning. It will be structured around lectures, will include individual text analysis and reflection, supplemented by in-class discussions. Assessment will be conducted through written exams and class presentations.

 


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