Interest courses | Dominican University College

Interest Courses in Philosophy and Theology

DUC welcomes anyone with an interest in philosophy or theology to audit interest courses. Students who take interest courses without seeking a grade or credit for the course are given auditor status. At DUC, auditors can register for up to 8 credits per semester and do not require any prior knowledge or qualifications to take an interest course. Also, registration into a certificate or degree program is not required. 

If you're auditing a course you'll be expected to complete all course requirements except the final exam, and your transcript will show your status as an auditor for the course. After completing a limited number of courses and achieving a reasonable level of academic success, you may be eligible to enrol in a full-time program of studies. 

 

 

 

Registration process for interest courses

 

Auditors are not required to submit an application package.  Simply register online by clicking on the button of your interest course(s) below or complete the course registration form found here for the desired course(s) and submit the completed form in person at the Office of the Registrar (Office 310) or send by mail to:

Office of the Registrar
96 Empress Ave. 
Ottawa, Ontario
K1R 7G3

For more information regarding course availability, or to make an appointment to register, please email us at info@dominicanu.ca or call us 613-233-5696 (x310).

 


Faculty of Theology

Winter 2019

 

Theological Anthropology

Tuesdays, 8:30am - 11:20am | Winter semester - Starts on January 7, 2019
Professor: Aurélie Caldwell
Course Code: DTHY 1521

This course investigates how our common and contemporary human condition can be enlightened through Christian faith. Creation and Creature are approached with Biblical narratives and Psalms. This raises some issues. How are autonomy and dependence connected with creation understood as call and relation? Is there any coherence between the human condition and Christian hope in everlasting life and resurrection of flesh? What do Christians believe about the Last judgement, Heaven, Purgatory and Hell? How to distinguish imaginative projections and solid faith when we confess what has not yet taken place? Each student does some readings provided by the professor and involves in further discussions in class. A short paper is due each month.

 


An Introduction to the Study of the Pentateuch

Wednesdays, 8:30am - 11:20am | Winter semester - Starts on January 7, 2019
Professor: Gilbert Munana
Course Code: DTHY 1120

This course studies the first five books of the Bible, that the Jewish tradition calls Torah and the Christian tradition Pentateuch. After a presentation of their content and canonical aspects, their literary problems will be studied, which led to the classical documentary hypothesis. Then, new approaches will be presented, and finally the major themes of the Pentateuch.

 


Fundamental Moral Theology

Wednesdays, 1:30pm - 4:20pm | Winter semester - Starts on January 7, 2019
Professor: Didier Caenepeel
Course Code: DTHY 1520

The lectures offer an introduction to the constitution of Christian ethics and the discourses structuring it: the historical development of moral theology frameworks, the sources and methods of ethical reflection, the articulation of moral and theological dimensions, the use and reference to the Bible as a source of moral theology discourses, the moral life and the pursuit of happiness, the role of law, conscience, responsible freedom, moral acts and discernment, ethical creativity and the moral agent. 

 


The Mystery of God II

Thursdays, 8:30am - 11:20am | Winter semester - Starts on January 7, 2019
Professor: Aurélie Caldwell
Course Code: DTHY 1423

This course tackles the Trinitarian identity of the one God: is Trinitarian faith included in Jewish monotheism or opposed to it? How has the Trinitarian dogma been established through time? Will be explored some key inputs: the foundations provided by Saint Augustine in the West; the speculative creativity of Saint Thomas Aquinas; the Orthodox perspective and Ecumenical dialog on the Holy Spirit. Some tricky and contemporary questions will also be investigated: How to qualify God’s fatherhood? Does Trinity provide a model of community? The course goes on by qualifying God’s creative action into the world and God’s sovereignty challenged by evil. Each student does some readings provided by the professor and involves in further discussions in class. A short paper is due each month. 

 


Faculty of Philosophy

Winter 2019

 

Main Doctrincal Currents in the Middle Ages

Monday, 1:30pm - 4:20pm | Winter semester - Starts on January 7, 2019
Professor: Mark Nyvlt
Course Code: DPHY 1211

This course will study: the transformations of the ancient heritage (Saint Augustine, the pseudoDionysius, Boethius); the leading thinkers and schools of the XIth and XIIth centuries; the translations of Aristotelian, Arab and Jewish works; the high points of Scholasticism in the XIIIth century (Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus); and Ockham’s nominalism, in the XIVth century. 

 


Philosophy of Science

Wednesdays, 8:30am - 11:20am | Winter semester - Starts on January 7, 2019
Professor: Jean-François Méthot 
Course Code: DPHY 2851

The course examines basic issues in philosophy of science, such as the nature of scientific knowledge and explanation, the classification of sciences, the evolution of science. The question of justification of scientific theories will be emphasized, from Hume’s critique of induction to models proposed by Hempel and Popper. 

 


The Philosophical Thought of Saint Thomas Aquinas

Tuesdays, 1:30pm - 4:20pm | Winter semester - Starts on January 7, 2019
Professor: Maxime Allard
Course Code: DPHY 2218

In this course, we present (1) the life and works of St. Thomas (the university institutions in XIIIth century Paris, the different types of literary product found among Thomas’s writings and the occasion of their composition), and (2) some major philosophical themes: creation and the possibility of an eternal world; God’s knowledge of things other than himself; the intrinsic coherence of the human being; morality and man the image of God.

 


Science and Ethics

Tuesdays, 5:30pm - 8:20pm | Winter semester - Starts on January 7, 2019
Professor: Gaston LeNotre
Course Code: DPHY 2690

The morality of science has been a debated topic at least since the emergence of modern science. This course examines scientific discourse and practice as presented by philosophy of science. After a survey of some of the main approaches to the justification of scientific theories, such as confirmationism and falsificationism, Thomas Kuhn’s model of scientific revolution, and Paul Feyerabend’s anarchistic position, we will look at the history of scientific ideas, notably through the study of Michel Foucault’s, The Order of Things. We will then explore the intersection of values and ethics to consider the old cliché that “science is fundamentally a-moral” through the study of various cases provided by the professor and the students, such as human experimentation, animal experimentation, stem-cell research, pharmaco-centrism, environmental responsibility and many others. Finally, we will explore research ethics and research ethics bodies in Canada.

 


Philosophy of Culture

Tuesdays, 1:30pm - 4:20pm | Winter semester - Starts on January 7, 2019
Professor: Jean-François Méthot
Course Code: DPHY 3863

We live in a natural world, but culture is our intellectual home. This course explores the concept of culture and its evolution from the Greek paideia to the Modern concept of culture. Special attention will be paid to the works of Giambattista Vico, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Friedrich Nietzsche and Charles Taylor. Other issues such as multiculturalism, cultural relativism and post-modern culture will also be discussed. 

 


Currents in Phenomenology I

Wednesdays, 5:30pm - 8:20pm | Winter semester - Starts on January 7, 2019
Professor: R. Parker
Course Code: DPHY 2845

This course examines the phenomenological approach to philosophical problems, theoretical or practical. It will include discussions of some seminal works of Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Hannah Arendt and Maurice Merleau-Ponty.

 


Philosophy of Law

Thursdays, 8:30am - 11:20am | Winter semester - Starts on January 7, 2019
Professor: Francis K. Peddle
Course Code: DPHY 3841

This course explores competing philosophical theories of the origin and nature of the law. Positive and natural law primarily will be contrasted, analyzed and critically evaluated within the overall context of the philosophical tradition and the history of philosophy. The goal of the course is to provide some general philosophical frameworks for understanding the nature of law and its relation to ethics, the organization of civil society and the state. On occasion the philosophical analysis of the law will be complemented with practical examples from statutory materials, case law and contemporary legal debates. 

 


Contemporary Philosophy of Mind

Thursdays, 1:30pm - 4:20pm | Winter semester - Starts on January 7, 2019
Professor: Iva Apostolova
Course Code: DPHY 3654

This course aims at familiarizing students with seminal topics present in the contemporary philosophy of mind debate. The course will be divided into two parts. Part One will focus on the notion of consciousness as presented by such philosophers as Thomas Nagel, Daniel Dennett, David Chalmers, Paul Churchland, Sydney Shoemaker, Derek Parfit, Maria Schetchman, and Daniel Stoljar. In this part of the course, students will be exposed to the theory of qualia, the explanatory gap, the nature of intentionality, and reductionism with regards to personal identity. Part Two will deal with the theories surrounding the mind-body/mind-brain debate, namely dualism, behaviorism, the identity theory, mental causation, and functionalism.

 


Critical Thinking and Research Methodology

Fridays, 1:30pm - 4:20pm | Winter semester - Starts on January 7, 2019
Professor: R. Parker
Course Code: DPHY 1104

The course aims to develop fundamental skills in reasoning and critical thinking through the study of argument types, logical structures, criteria used in the evaluation of arguments, and forms of fallacious reasoning. Students will also be introduced to the basic elements involved in conducting philosophical and theological research, and will learn about the various phases and major components of a research project.

 


Do you have any further questions? An advisor will be happy to help. 

 

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