Plato’s Phaedrus and Philebus | Dominican University College

Plato’s Phaedrus and Philebus

This seminar is a close examination of the multiple interactions of dialectical philosophy, myth and rhetoric, knowledge, taxonomy and idea in perhaps two of Plato’s most enigmatic dialogues from the middle and late periods – Phaedrus and Philebus. The first third of the seminar will primarily explore the nature of the soul in its affective and self-driven capacities in the Phaedrus.  The nature of love – its miraculous nuances and fascinations, the limitations of the art of writing and the allurements of skilled persuasion and linguistic prowess are but a few of the themes taken up in the Phaedrus. The balance of the seminar will focus on the various dianoetic and thymo-eidetic approaches to the good life investigated by Plato in the Philebus. Some attempt will be made to correlate the two dialogues in terms of such doctrines as collection and division, dialectic and epistemology. Although written almost two and a half millennia ago, these dialogues are equally a critique of the modern academy and humanistic study with their elevation of reading and writing above reasoning, of rhetoric and opinion above truth and objective insight. Knowledge of ancient Greek would be helpful but is not required.

Credits: 
3
Language: 
English
Faculty: 
Philosophy
Professor: 
Semester: 
Winter
Time: 
Wednesday 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Room Number: 
202
Academic Year: 
2014-15
Level: 
Graduate
Course Code: 
DPHY 6232
Program: 
Doctorate in Philosophy